animal health

Written and reviewed by board-certified veterinarians, find animal care advice and information for companion, exotic, equine, and livestock animals.

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Be aware — hairballs are the natural result of your cat’s grooming behavior

The medical term for hairball is “trichobezoar.” These masses accumulate in the digestive systems of animals that groom themselves, including cats, rabbits, cattle, even llamas. And hairballs are often no laughing matter for some species, sometimes requiring surgical removal because they may cause cause obstructions and dangerous medical conditions.

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Rub in improved wellness with medical massage

Have you ever had a massage? While many forms of massage exist, medical massage is a type of body work known as “outcome-based massage.” It is becoming increasingly available within human and veterinary medicine.

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Provide preventive care, and parasites won’t bug your buddy

Parasites come in two main varieties, external and internal, but all are bad for your pet’s health. In some cases, they endanger human health as well. With the potential for parasites to harm both animal and human health, veterinarians at Colorado State University consider parasite control a cornerstone of preventive veterinary care.

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Exercise helps avoid fat cat and pudgy pooch

This time of year, busy schedules and frequently frigid weather make it harder to stick with healthy habits, such as taking the dog for a walk. Yet finding ways to exercise your dog and cat during the winter can benefit the whole family, and save your pet from becoming a fat cat or a pudgy pooch.

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Is insurance right for you and your companion?

When Fido or Fifi gets sick or injured, unexpected medical expenses can create quite a financial strain. Like human health insurance, pet insurance is an option available to help families offset some or all of the costs of medical care.

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The importance of vaccination

In veterinary medicine, vaccination is the No. 1 defense against some very nasty – and often fatal – diseases in pets, including rabies and distemper in dogs and panleukopenia in cats.

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Ear ye, ear ye, otitis is common in dogs

Ear inflammation, or otitis, is one of the most common medical problems that dogs experience; because there are many causes, it is important to seek veterinary care to prevent severe pain and damage to deeper structures of the ear, which may lead to dizziness and long- term hearing loss.

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