Gilbert John

Assistant Dean for Research College Office

About Gilbert

Dr. Gilbert John is the Assistant Dean of Research in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr. John’s research interest focuses on the structure and function of Flavin proteins in Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa which are potential human pathogens. Flavin proteins are important in neutralizing the toxicity of oxygen-radicals, thus may serve to support the survival mechanisms found within bacteria. These bacterial Flavin proteins are known as azoreductases, and have been characterized as having broad substrate specificity. Important findings related to azoreductase physiology, molecular function, and structural state have been published.

Education

BS, Microbiology, Colorado State University, 1985PhD, Microbiology, Colorado State University, 1990

Links

PubMed

                

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