James Graham

Faculty Biomedical Sciences

247 Physiology

970-491-2251

About James

I teach the andrology portion of reproductive physiology to veterinary and graduate students. I also teach endocrinology to undergraduate (BMS430) and graduate students and coordinate a team taught course on the laboratory techniques used in reproduction research. My research focuses on gamete physiology, reproductive physiology and cryobiology, with an emphasis on membrane biochemistry and function. My research focuses on gamete physiology, reproductive physiology and cryobiology, with an emphasis on membrane biochemistry and function. Membranes in spermatozoa are modified extensively during transit through the epididymis and the female reproductive tract prior to fertilization, or during in vitro manipulations such as cryopreservation. I am interested in understanding the membrane modifications that occur during these processes, i.e., what changes occur, when they occur and they affect cell function. Using liposome and cyclodextrin technologies, the membranes of cells (spermatozoa, embryos and cells in culture) can be changed in predetermined ways resulting in altered cell functions that can be exploited to increase cryosurvival rates, induce sperm capacitation, and many other cell functions. In addition, using proteomic and genomic approaches, we can begin to learn other aspects of sperm physiology that may play important roles in sperm fertilizing potential. Finally, understanding the relationships between reproductive endocrinology and physiology, I am interested in developing oral contraceptive technologies that can be delivered to problem feral animal populations. Current studies investigate mechanisms by which cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins and liposomes interact with cells to induce capacitation and the acrosome reaction in sperm, thereby allowing their subsequent penetration into oocytes in vitro; and to modify cell membranes to permit more efficient cell cryosurvival. Other experiments are involved in producing, preserving and enabling oral uptake of molecules that can inhibit the fertility of targeted problem feral animals.

Education

PhD, Cornell University, 1985BS, University of Minnesota, 1979

Research Specialty

Cryobiology and Male Reproductive PhysiologyMixed Animal (large and small)Wildlife/Zoo

                


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