Deborah Roess

Emeritus Biomedical Sciences

C104 Chemistry

970-491-7326

About Deborah

I use laser-optical instrumentation to measure the lateral and rotational motions of plasma membrane components. One area of study is the molecular motions of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors on luteal and Leydig cells. Movement of molecules, such as the LH receptor, in a membrane is affected by receptor and hormone structure, cytoskeletal components capable of physically anchoring the LH receptor in the membrane, and by interactions of the receptor with other membrane proteins. We are interested in determining how these features are involved in regulating functions of reproductive organs. I also use single particle tracking to determine how LH receptors are distributed on single cells and biochemical methods to identify other cell membrane proteins that interact with LH receptors. Such interactions may be necessary for regulating hormone secretion by hormone-responsive cells.

Education

MA in English Literature, Colorado State University, 2021PhD in Physiology, St. Louis University, 1982BA in Biology, University of Missouri, Columbia, 1978

Links

Publications

                

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