Research Topic Directory Immunology

Name E-mail Address Phone Department
970-491-5746Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-4014Clinical Sciences
970-297-5423Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-6138Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-4350Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-1009Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-2926Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3313Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3470Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3975Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7840Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7086Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3525Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-2229Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7306Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-5357Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-1455Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7350Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-4034Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-6144Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-5667Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-5903Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-5112Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-4117Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

            Array
(
    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => Veterinary Diagnostic Lab - 300 W Drake Rd
            [BusinessAddress2] => Diagnostic Medical Center - DMC 314
            [BusinessCity] => Fort Collins 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 80523
            [BusinessState] => CO
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => bpodell
            [EmailAddress] => Brendan.Podell@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 1
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Brendan
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 931
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Podell
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 428
                                    [IsPrimary] => 
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-5746
                                )

                            [1] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 37956
                                    [IsPrimary] => 1
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-297-0327
                                )

                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 514
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Podell's laboratory emphasizes research in mechanisms of disease, pathogenesis, and pathology. These areas of study are applied in the development of animal models to better understand host-pathogen interaction, identification of factors influencing host susceptibility to infection, and for the identification of new host-directed treatment approaches. Among animal models of tuberculosis, our laboratory focuses primarily on the guinea pig model, which most accurately reflects the pathology of human patients with active tuberculosis. This model is currently being studied to better understand the mechanisms by which diabetes increases the risk of developing active tuberculosis disease, a comorbidity of emerging importance, especially in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. In conjunction with the laboratory of Dr. Randall Basaraba, we have developed the first guinea pig model of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-tuberculosis comorbidity. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 319a
            [OtherName] => Brendan
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [1] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => Veterinary Teaching Hospital - 300 W Drake Rd
            [BusinessAddress2] => Animal Cancer Center - ACC 250
            [BusinessCity] => Fort Collins
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 80523
            [BusinessState] => CO
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => sdow
            [EmailAddress] => Steven.Dow@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Professor, Immunology | Director, Center for Immune and Regenerative Medicine
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Steven
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 1009
            [InternalTitle] => Internal Medicine Clinician
            [LastName] => Dow
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 823
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Dow received his DVM degree from the University of Georgia and completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at Colorado State University.  He then completed a PhD program in Comparative Pathology in the laboratory of Ed Hoover at Colorado State University.  After that, Dr. Dow completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Jewish Center in the laboratory of Dr. Terry Potter, before joining the faculty of the Department of Clinical Sciences at CSU in 2002.  He is currently a professor of immunology in the DCS and the director of the Center for Immune and Regenerative Medicine at CSU.
                )

            [MiddleName] => W
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => VTH
            [OfficeRoomName] => ACC250
            [OtherName] => Steven
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => https://labs.vetmedbiosci.colostate.edu/dow/
        )

    [2] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => Colorado State University
            [BusinessAddress2] => 231 Pathology
            [BusinessCity] => Fort Collins
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 80523
            [BusinessState] => CO
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => pravery
            [EmailAddress] => Paul.Avery@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Associate Professor
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Paul
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 2718
            [InternalTitle] => Associate Professor
            [LastName] => Avery
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 1916
                                    [IsPrimary] => 1
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-297-5423
                                )

                            [1] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 37579
                                    [IsPrimary] => 
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-6138
                                )

                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 815
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Avery is Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology.  His laboratory studies the early immune events surrounding feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection as a means to better understand the critical elements in the control of lentiviral infections, notably HIV.  He specifically studies CD8+ T-lymphocyte and dendritic cell responses to mucosally acquired FIV and the effects that augment the innate and cell-mediated immune response have on host control of the virus.  A second focus is enhanced detection and discrimination of lymphomas and leukemias in dogs and cats.  Immunophenotyping and gene microarray analysis are being used to identify prognostic markers in canine lymphocytic leukemias. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => R
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Diagnostic Medicine Center
            [OfficeRoomName] => 309
            [OtherName] => Paul
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [3] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => aavery
            [EmailAddress] => Anne.Avery@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Associate Professor
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Anne
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3106
            [InternalTitle] => Associate Professor
            [LastName] => Avery
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2240
                            [IsPrimary] => 1
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-6138
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 524
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Avery is Associate Professor of Immunology and the Director of the Clinical Immunology Laboratory.  The laboratory studies the immunological mechanisms that underlie the development of canine lymphoma and leukemia, and provides diagnostic services to thousands of veterinary clinics and patients each year.  Additional information about research projects and publications from the laboratory can be found at the Clinical Immunology Laboratory website, below. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => C
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 231
            [OtherName] => Anne
            [PhonePrivacy] => 
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [4] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => aizzo
            [EmailAddress] => Angelo.Izzo@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Angelo
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3125
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Izzo
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2256
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-4350
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 199
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Izzo is Associate Professor of Mycobacterial Immunology.  His laboratory develops protocols for testing novel M. Tb vaccine candidates in rodent low dose aerosol experimental models.  Mouse and the guinea pig models are used to dissect the immunological and pathological responses associated with vaccines, including investigations of innate immune response in induction of protective immune responses to M. Tb.  His lab currently evaluates M. Tb pathogenicity in inbred vs outbred guinea pig strains, and evaluates the relationship of clinical parameters (ie body temperature, arterial blood gas) to disease progression.
                )

            [MiddleName] => A
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => C220
            [OtherName] => Angelo
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [5] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => akkina
            [EmailAddress] => Ramesh.Akkina@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Professor
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Ramesh
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3131
            [InternalTitle] => Professor
            [LastName] => Akkina
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2260
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-1009
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 442
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Akkina is Professor of Virology. The Akkina laboratory focuses on vaccination and antiviral therapy strategies for HIV intervention using rodent models.  Ongoing studies involve developing high efficiency gene transfer methods including viral pseudotype and ribozyme expressing vectors.  Dr. Akkina’s laboratory is funded by multiple NIH grants and other extramural sources and is unique in developing and utilizing SCID-hu and RAG mice as novel models in which to study HIV and Dengue virus intervention. This work has lead to new models to assess topical mucosally applied drugs to prevent sexually transmitted HIV infection.
                )

            [MiddleName] => K
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 329
            [OtherName] => Ramesh
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [6] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => Room B222
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => arschenk
            [EmailAddress] => Alan.Schenkel@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Alan
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3164
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Schenkel
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2293
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-2926
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 803
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Schenkel studies the roles of adhesion molecules in leukocyte extravasation (exit from blood into tissues) in response to inflammation. Many of these molecules control how different populations of leukocytes, such as monocytes or lymphocytes, can respond spatially and temporally to infection and disease. In particular, Dr. schenkel is interested in pulmonary (lung) diseases, like Cystic Fibrosis and Idiopathic Pulmonary fibrosis. Dr. Schenkel currently serves as the Director of the MIP Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program.
                )

            [MiddleName] => R
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => B222
            [OtherName] => Alan
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [7] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => Colorado State University
            [BusinessAddress2] => Pathology 314
            [BusinessCity] => Fort Collins
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 80523
            [BusinessState] => CO
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => basaraba
            [EmailAddress] => Randall.Basaraba@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Professor
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Randall
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3182
            [InternalTitle] => Professor
            [LastName] => Basaraba
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2309
                            [IsPrimary] => 1
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-3313
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 484
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Basaraba is a Full Professor of Mycobacterial Pathology.  His laboratory focuses on the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in several animal models. Dr. Basaraba’s work, funded by NIH and the American Diabetes Foundation, examines the Mycobacterial sequestration in granulomas and the synergistic relationship of tuberculosis and diabetes worldwide.  Working in collaboration with Drs. Orme, Lenaerts, Crick as a member of the CSU Mycobacteriology Research Laboratories, Basaraba’s group focuses on understanding the unique state of mycobacteria in granulomas and biofilms important in development of anti-microbial resistance.
                )

            [MiddleName] => J
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 314
            [OtherName] => Randall
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/Pages/Randall-Basaraba.aspx
        )

    [8] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => bfoy
            [EmailAddress] => Brian.Foy@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Brian
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3199
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Foy
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2323
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-3470
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 631
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Foy is a Professor and member of the Arthropod Borne Infectious Disease Laboratory. His laboratory focuses on the interactions of vectors with their hosts and with vector pathogens. The goal is to link research employing molecular, proteomic and genomic techniques to practical applications for controlling arthropod-borne diseases. A main research component in the Foy lab is to interrupt the intense transmission of malaria and arboviruses by targeting the vector through their bloodmeals using drugs that attack vector physiology and that inhibit pathogen development or using anti-vector immunity driven by vaccination. The Foy lab is also developing mosquitoes and other vectors as biosurveillance tools, studying unique aspects of arbovirus transmission and arbovirus survival in vectors, and studying poorly understood mosquito pathogens for their prospects to become vector-borne disease control tools.
                )

            [MiddleName] => D
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Aidl
            [OfficeRoomName] => 112
            [OtherName] => Brian
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/aidl/Pages/foy-brian.aspx
        )

    [9] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => ckm
            [EmailAddress] => Candace.Mathiason@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Candace
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3274
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Mathiason
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2401
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-3975
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 703
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Mathiason is Associate Professor of Pathobiology and Director of the Office of Vice President for Research (OVPR) Program for Research and Scholarly Excellence (PRSE)- Infectious Disease and Rapid Response Network. Dr. Mathiason’s research focuses on the role blood and maternal infections play in disease pathogenesis and transmission dynamics.  Her laboratory combines use of native and rodent in vivo hosts with highly sensitive in vitro assays to assimilate an understanding of the biological mechanisms associated with covert transmission of infectious agents.  The intent of these works is to provide basic science principles for continued efforts to mitigate infectious agents via preventative, therapeutic and vaccine therapies. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => K
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 229
            [OtherName] => Candace
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/prion-research-center/Pages/Mathiason-Laboratory.aspx
        )

    [10] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => dordway
            [EmailAddress] => D.Ordway@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Diane
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3347
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Ordway
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2473
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-7840
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 81
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Immunology, Vaccines and Drugs against Pathogenic Mycobacteria.

Worldwide the rate of drug-sensitive, multi-drug and extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases are increasing. The only available vaccine against M. tuberculosis, M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is unreliable and the use of anti-mycobacterial drugs has only lead to high rates of drug resistance. Primarily I am interested in elucidating the T cell and macrophage/dendritic cellular immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis through the use of novel multi-parameter flow cytometry in murine and guinea pigs models. These animal models are used to test vaccines and drugs and provide us with information on the nature of induction of protective immunity. 

I also collaborate with scientists in clinical research focused on elucidation of the immune mechanisms against Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => B408
            [OtherName] => Diane
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [11] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => gnc
            [EmailAddress] => Gerald.Callahan@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Gerald
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3417
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Callahan
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2534
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-7086
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 804
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Callahan writes about science for general audiences and holds a joint appointment in the department of English. His work has been featured on or in, among others, National Geographic Television, ABC Evening News, the Los Angeles Times, Salon.com, the Chicago Tribune, National Public Radio, Minnesota Public Radio, Talk Radio Europe – Spain, Ms. Magazine, the New Scientist, Discover Magazine, U.S. Today, the Vancouver Sun, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Georgia Straight, the Rocky Mountain News, ESPN, Publisher’s Weekly, Semana Magazine – Columbia, and EPOCA magazine – Brazil. His works have been translated into Japanese, Chinese, and Portuguese.
                )

            [MiddleName] => N
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 310
            [OtherName] => Gerald
            [PhonePrivacy] => 
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://www.geraldcallahan.com/
        )

    [12] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => jsspence
            [EmailAddress] => John.Spencer@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => John
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3580
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Spencer
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2692
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-3525
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 89
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Immunology of M. leprae and M. tuberculosis, epitope mapping, proteomics, and diagnostic development.
                )

            [MiddleName] => S
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => B208
            [OtherName] => John
            [PhonePrivacy] => 
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/Pages/John-Spencer.aspx
        )

    [13] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => kdobos
            [EmailAddress] => Karen.Dobos@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Karen
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3607
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Dobos
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2719
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-2229
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 829
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => The Dobos laboratory is focused on descriptive, comparative studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that are relevant to the development of 2nd generation vaccines and diagnostic assays. Specifically, the laboratory utilizes mass spectrometry, animal models of tuberculosis, and collaborations with clinical research groups to define macromolecules engaged in host-parasite interactions. This is accomplished through highly collaborative studies within CSU (principally with the laboratories of Drs. Angelo Izzo and Nicole Kruh-Garcia) and outside of the University.
                )

            [MiddleName] => Marie
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Univ Services Center
            [OfficeRoomName] => 200
            [OtherName] => Karen
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => https://labs.vetmedbiosci.colostate.edu/dobos/
        )

    [14] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => malba
            [EmailAddress] => Mercedes.Gonzalez-Juarrero@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Mercedes
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3712
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Gonzalez-Juarrero
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2807
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-7306
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 48
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Our interest is to study the basic nature of the cell mediated immune response to mycobacteria infections. Currently our research is focused on the role and dynamics of macrophage and dendritic cell populations during the early and late stages of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have recently defined changes in the macrophage cell populations in the lung during the course of pulmonary tuberculosis. Nowadays we are expanding our basic research towards definition of differences in the origin and function of macrophage cell populations derived from mucosal and lymphoid organs. The main aim of this research is to associate particular characteristics from each macrophage cell subset derived from different organs with the development of adaptive immunity, inflammatory responses and susceptibility to mycobacteria infections.
                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => B209A
            [OtherName] => Mercedes
            [PhonePrivacy] => 
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [15] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => marceiht
            [EmailAddress] => Marcela.Henao_Tamayo@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Marcela
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3716
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Henao Tamayo
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2812
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-5357
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 693
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Henao-Tamayo is an Assistant Professor of Mycobacterial Immunology, and Director of CSU-Flow Cytometry and Cells Sorting Core Facility. Her laboratory focuses in understanding the host-pathogen interaction during Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission, and the immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterial infections. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => I
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => C212
            [OtherName] => Marcela
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => https://labs.vetmedbiosci.colostate.edu/henao-tamayo/
        )

    [16] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => mzabel
            [EmailAddress] => Mark.Zabel@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Associate Director, Prion Research Center and Associate Dept. Head for Graduate Education
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Mark
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3787
            [InternalTitle] => Associate Director, Prion Research Center and Associate Dept. Head for Graduate Education
            [LastName] => Zabel
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2870
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-1455
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 635
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Zabel is Professor of Prion Biology and Immunology.  Drawing on his background in both immunology and prion biology, Dr. Zabel’s research program focuses on the interaction of prions with cells and receptors of the immune system and lymphoid tissues in the early entry, trafficking, and pathogenesis phases of prion infections.  Little is known regarding the cell surface molecules and molecular co-factors that control these events.  Using mice engineered to transgenically express both the cervid or ovine normal prion protein gene and selected receptors of the innate immune system, the Zabel lab examines the early lymphoid system distribution of prions and employs vector systems expressing prion-targeted interfering RNA molecules as therapeutic strategies for prion infections.  
                )

            [MiddleName] => D
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 227
            [OtherName] => Mark
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/Pages/Mark-Zabel.aspx
        )

    [17] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 1
            [EName] => schountz
            [EmailAddress] => Tony.Schountz@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 1
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => William
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 33225
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Schountz
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 39421
                            [IsPrimary] => 1
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-7350
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 525
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Tony Schountz is interested in understanding immune responses of reservoir hosts, particularly rodents and bats, of emerging zoonotic viruses that typically lead to apathogenic infections in the reservoirs, the role of immunopathology during viral infection, and vaccine development and immunomodulatory therapeutics for zoonotic viruses. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => A
            [NamePrivacy] => 1
            [OfficeBldgName] => Aidl
            [OfficeRoomName] => 110
            [OtherName] => Tony
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/mip/aidl/Pages/schountz-tony.aspx
        )

    [18] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => danregan
            [EmailAddress] => Daniel.Regan@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Assistant Professor, Cancer Immunology and Pathology
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Daniel
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 33234
            [InternalTitle] => Assistant Professor, Cancer Immunology and Pathology
            [LastName] => Regan
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 36549
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-297-4034
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 799
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Regan received his DVM degree from the University of Georgia in 2011, and subsequently completed his residency training in veterinary anatomic pathology (2014) and PhD (Comparative Pathology; 2017) in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology (DMIP) at Colorado State University. In 2018 he accepted his current faculty position in the Flint Animal Cancer Center and DMIP in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State University.

Tumors co-evolve in the presence of a complex micro-environment composed of a mixture of resident and recruited host cells. The focus of Dr. Regan’s laboratory is to increase our understanding of the interplay between the immune system and (non-immune) tumor stroma, and how these compartments of the tumor microenvironment promote metastasis as well as respond to and mediate extrinsic mechanisms of resistance to anti-cancer therapy. To investigate this area of cancer biology, his laboratory utilizes a combination of in vitro 3-dimensional tumor co-culture models and animal models, focusing on breast and bone cancer (osteosarcoma). Dr. Regan also has a strong interest in comparative oncology and leveraging naturally occurring cancers in dogs as both a surrogate and intermediary model to evaluate and validate his laboratory’s investigations into the tumor microenvironment. In collaboration with the laboratory of Dr. Steve Dow, we recently targeted an innate immune cell subset known as inflammatory monocytes as an immunotherapy for tumor metastasis, via identification of a small molecule compound that could be re-purposed to effectively inhibit monocyte recruitment. We confirmed the translational potential of these findings by utilizing this drug for monocyte-targeted immunotherapy clinical studies conducted in dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma. Results from these translational studies have led to a phase I clinical trial in children with osteosarcoma.

Our continued long-term research goal is to fully elucidate the mechanisms by which tumors prime non-malignant host stromal cells of distant organs to promote their metastasis and chemo-resistance, in order to identify novel targets for host-directed stromal therapies which “poison the soil” for effective combination with conventional tumor cell targeted drugs.
                )

            [MiddleName] => Patrick
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Diagnostic Medicine Center
            [OfficeRoomName] => ACC242
            [OtherName] => Dan
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [19] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => gadean
            [EmailAddress] => Gregg.Dean@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Department Head, Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Gregg
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 33255
            [InternalTitle] => Department Head, Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
            [LastName] => Dean
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 36628
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-6144
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 588
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Dean is Professor and Head of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology at CSU. Dr. Dean’s research program focuses on mucosal immunology and the immunopathology of the feline and human immunodeficiency viruses (FIV, HIV) and feline coronavirus. Major projects include:  1. Developing an orally delivered mucosal vaccine against HIV-1 using the commensal organism, Lactobacillus acidophilus, as a vaccine platform, 2. Investigation of the interaction between intestinal microbiome, host mucosal immune responses and vaccines, and 3. Determining the mucosal immune correlates of protection against feline enteric coronavirus infection. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => Alan
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 110e
            [OtherName] => Gregg
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [20] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => jbian2
            [EmailAddress] => Jifeng.Bian@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Assistant Professor
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Jifeng
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 33257
            [InternalTitle] => Assistant Professor
            [LastName] => Bian
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 36741
                            [IsPrimary] => 1
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-5667
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 636
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Bian received his dental medicine degree at Shandong Medical University, a Ph.D. degree from Shandong University, and his postdoctoral training at University of Kentucky. He joined Dr. Glenn Telling’s laboratory to study prion diseases in 2005. Dr Bian’s work currently focuses: 1. The physiology function of prion protein; 2. The mechanism of prion formation, replication, and evolution; 3. The molecular basis of prion strains; 4. The mechanism of prion interspecies transmission; and the effective treatment for prion diseases by using a combination of biochemical, cellular, transgenic and gene knock-in mouse models.
                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Pathology
            [OfficeRoomName] => 319A
            [OtherName] => Jifeng
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [21] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => lvkendal
            [EmailAddress] => lon.Kendall@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Staff
            [EmployeeTitle] => Administrative Professional
            [EmployeeType] => Administrative Professional
            [FirstName] => Lonnie
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 33634
            [InternalTitle] => Administrative Professional
            [LastName] => Kendall
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 36850
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-5903
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 617
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Associate Professor of Laboratory Animal Medicine.

Interests: Host immune response, diagnostics, laboratory animal pathology.
                )

            [MiddleName] => Vern
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => 
            [OfficeRoomName] => 
            [OtherName] => Lon
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [22] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => macneill
            [EmailAddress] => Amy.MacNeill@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Amy
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 34974
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => MacNeill
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 39487
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-297-5112
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 694
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Amy MacNeill graduated from the University of Florida with a B.S. in chemistry in 1994 and a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1998. Following a year in private practice, she returned to the University of Florida to complete a Ph.D. in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Moyer and a residency in veterinary clinical pathology. She became a board-certified veterinary pathologist in 2004 and was awarded a Ph.D. in virology and immunology in 2005. That same year she joined the faculty at the University of Illinois as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathobiology and the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. In 2014, she accepted a clinical pathology faculty position at Colorado State University. She coordinates the Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology Department Combined Residency Program. Her research interests include isolation and characterization of canine and feline tumor cells and the study of poxviruses as anticancer agents.
                )

            [MiddleName] => Leone
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Diagnostic Medicine Center
            [OfficeRoomName] => 110
            [OtherName] => Amy
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [23] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => grober
            [EmailAddress] => Gregory.Robertson@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Gregory
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 36711
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Robertson
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 40942
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-4117
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 614
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Gregory Robertson Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology at Colorado State University. He received his BSc (Microbiology and Clinical Laboratory Sciences) from Louisiana Tech University and his Ph.D. (Microbiology and Immunology) from LSU Health Science Center, Shreveport.  Dr. Robertson has more than 20 years of classical and clinical microbiology experience with emphasis in antibacterial discovery and mode-of-action studies for novel and existing classes of antimicrobials. This includes efforts in academia, and also with larger pharmaceutical corporations (Eli Lilly and Co) and smaller bio-pharmaceutical groups (Cumbre Pharmaceuticals). His current research is focused on Mycobacterium tuberculosis host-pathogen interactions and the development and application of novel preclinical animal models to further anti-tuberculosis drug development and evaluate drug resistance. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => T
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Micro
            [OfficeRoomName] => B308
            [OtherName] => Gregory
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

)