Research Topic Directory Virology

Name E-mail Address Phone Department
970-297-4109Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-1287Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-5423Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-1009Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3470Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-6330Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-8243Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-3975Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7587Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7579Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-0652Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-8604Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-5768Biomedical Sciences
970-491-6856College Office
970-491-1081Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-2968Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7350Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-6144Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-5667Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-8611Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-297-5112Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-492-4464Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology
970-491-7833Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

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                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Avery is Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology.  His laboratory studies the early immune events surrounding feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection as a means to better understand the critical elements in the control of lentiviral infections, notably HIV.  He specifically studies CD8+ T-lymphocyte and dendritic cell responses to mucosally acquired FIV and the effects that augment the innate and cell-mediated immune response have on host control of the virus.  A second focus is enhanced detection and discrimination of lymphomas and leukemias in dogs and cats.  Immunophenotyping and gene microarray analysis are being used to identify prognostic markers in canine lymphocytic leukemias. 
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                    [ProfileText] => My group is interested in the molecular virology and biochemistry of mosquito-borne Arboviruses. Arboviruses, including flaviviruses and alphaviruses, are the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogens worldwide. For example, approximately 2/3 of the world’s population is at risk for infection by dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, or related flaviviruses. Arbovirus infection can result in disease symptoms ranging from mild flu-like illness to debilitating encephalitis or death. Because arboviral infection is such a large health and socio-economic problem globally, my research has focused on finding ways to reduce human disease caused by these mosquito-borne viruses. We have a number of collaborative basic and translational research projects that involve flaviviruses (dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever) and alphaviruses (Sindbis, Chikungunya).
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                    [ProfileText] => I am professionally known as Carol D. Blair. My research emphasizes molecular biology and genetics of arbovirus replication and interactions with mosquito vectors.
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