Research Topic Directory Neuroendocrinology

Name E-mail Address Phone Department
970-491-5388Biomedical Sciences
970-491-4300Biomedical Sciences
970-491-1672Biomedical Sciences
970-491-2533Biomedical Sciences

            Array
(
    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => CVMBS Biomedical Sciences Dept.
            [BusinessAddress2] => Office: Anatomy/Zoology W330
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 1
            [EName] => bhanda
            [EmailAddress] => Bob.Handa@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 1
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Professor - Neuroendocrinology
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Robert
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3204
            [InternalTitle] => Professor
            [LastName] => Handa
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 2329
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-5388
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 0
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => 
                )

            [MiddleName] => J
            [NamePrivacy] => 1
            [OfficeBldgName] => Az
            [OfficeRoomName] => W330
            [OtherName] => Bob
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => 
        )

    [1] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => gamberg
            [EmailAddress] => Gregory.Amberg@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Gregory
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 3407
            [InternalTitle] => Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences
            [LastName] => Amberg
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 2528
                                    [IsPrimary] => 
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-4300
                                )

                            [1] => stdClass Object
                                (
                                    [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                                    [Id] => 44973
                                    [IsPrimary] => 1
                                    [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-6028
                                )

                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 176
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Amberg is Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular Pharmacology.  His laboratory investigates how reactive oxygen species induce pathological changes in arterial smooth muscle associated with hypertension. Results from this research aim to provide insight into understanding why clinical trials with antioxidant supplements generally produce negative results and thereby lead to new pharmacological tools for the clinical prevention and management of hypertension. Blocking the increased calcium channel function should prevent arterial contraction leading to high blood pressure and diseases such as stroke.  Events underlying altered calcium channel function during hypertension are being explored by a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, voltage-clamp electrophysiology, fluorescent calcium imaging and video microscopy of intact arteries to seek new therapies for arterial disease.
                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Az
            [OfficeRoomName] => W302
            [OtherName] => Gregory
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/bms/Pages/gregory-amberg.aspx
        )

    [2] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => tobets
            [EmailAddress] => Stuart.Tobet@ColoState.EDU
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Stuart
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 4002
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Tobet
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 3072
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-1672
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 221
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => Dr. Stuart Tobet is Professor of Neurobiology. Dr. Tobet’s research program examines organization of clusters of neurons deep in the preoptic area and hypothalamus centers that act as key relay stations that control many homeostatic mechanisms (e.g. body temperature regulation) and motivated behaviors (e.g., feeding and drinking), and regulate many sex-dependent functions. Time-lapse video microscopy is used to observe cell movements in slices of embryonic brain tissue.  Additional projects involving motion of cells in the adult pituitary (gonadotropes) and ovary (follicles and ova) are interests in the lab particularly as related to developing microfluidic devices and biosensors for following molecular changes.  The Tobet laboratory employs techniques spanning in vivo to in vitro, molecular to cellular and behavioral.
                )

            [MiddleName] => A
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Az
            [OfficeRoomName] => W224
            [OtherName] => Stuart
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/bms/Pages/stuart-tobet.aspx
        )

    [3] => stdClass Object
        (
            [AddressPrivacy] => 1
            [BusinessAddress1] => 
            [BusinessAddress2] => 
            [BusinessCity] => 
            [BusinessPostalCode] => 
            [BusinessState] => 
            [CSUId] => 0
            [DepartmentGroup] => 
            [DirectoryPrivacy] => 
            [EName] => bpmyers
            [EmailAddress] => Brent.Myers@colostate.edu
            [EmailPrivacy] => 
            [EmployeeCategory] => Faculty
            [EmployeeTitle] => Faculty
            [EmployeeType] => Faculty
            [FirstName] => Brent
            [GraduationYear] => 
            [HasMemberCV] => 
            [Id] => 37729
            [InternalTitle] => Faculty
            [LastName] => Myers
            [MemberContacts] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [MemberContactResponse] => stdClass Object
                        (
                            [ContactTypeDescription] => Office
                            [Id] => 42526
                            [IsPrimary] => 
                            [PhoneNumber] => 970-491-2533
                        )

                )

            [MemberDirectoryProfile] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [Id] => 599
                    [ProfileMetaData] => 
                    [ProfileText] => My research is generally focused on the integrative neuroscience of stress. Specific projects combine behavioral neuroscience, cardiovascular and endocrine physiology, and neurocircuit analysis to determine the mechanistic basis of stress effects on health. Current studies are particularly focused on the neurobiological mechanisms linking depression and cardiovascular disease. Stress-induced changes in cardiovascular reactivity represent a significant detriment to long-term health and mortality. Changes in autonomic regulation following chronic stress may generate a predisposition to co-morbid depression and cardiovascular disease. To identify the neural substrates linking chronic stress, cardiovascular disease, and depression, my laboratory uses a variety of tools including optogenetics, radiotelemetry, immunohistochemistry, connectional anatomy, confocal microscopy, plasma hormone analysis, and social/affective behavioral assays. 
                )

            [MiddleName] => 
            [NamePrivacy] => 
            [OfficeBldgName] => Az
            [OfficeRoomName] => W212
            [OtherName] => Brent
            [PhonePrivacy] => 1
            [StudentLevel] => 
            [Website] => http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/academics/bms/Pages/myers-brent.aspx
        )

)