Dean Crick

Faculty Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

C321 Micro

970-491-3308

About Dean

Dr. Crick is Professor of Mycobacterial Biochemistry. The research interests of his laboratory involve the metabolism of isoprenoids, one of the most structurally diverse and biologically important families of compounds known in nature. Of particular interest are the M. tuberculosis enzymes involved in the synthesis of isoprenoids (such as prenyl phosphates) and the enzymes that are involved in isoprenoid metabolism, including the glycosyltransferases involved in the cell wall and lipid biosynthesis—keys enzymes in development of anti-mycobacterial drugs as well as drug resistance. An additional research focus is on the enzymes that transport (flip) activated prenyl phosphate-linked saccharides across bacterial membranes in pathogenic organisms.

Education

MS, University of British Columbia, 1984PhD, University of Western Ontario, 1989BS, University of British Columbia, 1982

                

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