Amy MacNeill

Faculty Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology

110 Diagnostic Medicine Center

970-297-5112

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About Amy

Dr. Amy MacNeill graduated from the University of Florida with a B.S. in chemistry in 1994 and a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1998. Following a year in private practice, she returned to the University of Florida to complete a Ph.D. in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Moyer and a residency in veterinary clinical pathology. She became a board-certified veterinary pathologist in 2004 and was awarded a Ph.D. in virology and immunology in 2005. That same year she joined the faculty at the University of Illinois as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathobiology and the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. In 2014, she accepted a clinical pathology faculty position at Colorado State University. She coordinates the Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology Department Combined Residency Program. Her research interests include isolation and characterization of canine and feline tumor cells and the study of poxviruses as anticancer agents.

Education

TuftStudy Program, Tufts University, 1989BS, University of Florida, 1994DVM, University of Florida, 1998Pathology Residency, University of Florida, 2003PhD, University of Florida, 2005

Publications

Barger, A. M., MacNeill, A. L. (2016). Small Animal Cytologic Diagnosis. London, UK: Manson Publishing.Barger, A. M., MacNeill, A. L. (2015). Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Techniques for Veterinary Technicians. Ames, IA: Wiley.Gal, A., Trusiano, B., French, A.F., Lopez-Villalobos, N., MacNeill, A.L. (2017). Serum fructosamine concentration in uncontrolled hyperthyroid diabetic cats is within the population reference interval. Veterinary Sciences, 4(17). MacNeill, A. L. (2017). Getting the most from your cytology samples. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice, 47(1), ix-x.Thompson C. A., MacNeill, A. L. (2017). Common infectious organisms. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice, 47(1), 151-164.MacNeill, A. L. (2016). Evaluation of available diagnostic techniques for feline infectious peritonitis. Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, 29(10), 1-3.Corner, S., Walsh, T., Padilla, L., MacNeill, A. L., Wallig, M., Kiupel, M., Terio, K. (2016). Histologic and immunohistochemical characterization of pheochromocytomas in twenty clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa). Veterinary Pathology. [Epub ahead of print]Kinn, V. G., Hilgenberg, V. A., MacNeill, A. L. (2016). Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model. Oncolytic virotherapy, 5, 59-71.Koohestani, F., Qiang, W., MacNeill, A. L., Druschitz, S. A., Serna, V. A., Adur, M., Kurita, T., Nowak, R. A. (2016). Halofuginone suppresses growth of human uterine leiomyoma cells in a mouse xenograft model. Human reproduction (Oxford, England), 31(7), 1540-51.Rout, E., Hoon-Hanks, L., Gustafson, T., Ehrhart, E. J., MacNeill, A. L. (2016). What is your diagnosis? Clitoral mass in a dog. Veterinary Clinical Pathology, 45(1), 197-198.MacNeill, A. L. (2015). On the potential of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of canine cancers. Oncolytic Virotherapy, 4, 95-107.Schnelle, A. N., Barger, A. M., MacNeill, A. L., Mitchell, M. M., Solter, P. (2015). Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding. Veterinary clinical pathology / American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology, 44(2), 275-86.Bolfer, L. H., Schmit, J. M., MacNeill, A. L., Ragetly, C. A., Bennett, R. A., McMichael, M. A. (2015). Subtotal penile amputation and urethrostomy followed by chemotherapy in a dog with penile hemangiosarcoma. Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 51(1), 25-30.MacNeill, A. L., Barger, A. M., Skowronski, M. C., Lanka, S., Maddox, C. W. (2015). Identification of Cytauxzoon felis infection in domestic cats from southern Illinois. Journal of feline medicine and surgery, 17(12), 1069-1072.Moore, A. R., Allender, M. C., Mitchell, M. A., MacNeill, A. L. (2015). Evaluation of plasma fibrinogen concentration as a diagnostic indicator of inflammation in red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 246(2), 245-53.Gal, A., Lin, P. C., Barger, A. M., MacNeill, A. L., Ko, C. (2014). Vaginal fold histology reduces the variability introduced by vaginal exfoliative cytology in the classification of mouse estrous cycle stages. Toxicologic pathology, 42(8), 1212-20.Rice, A. D., Adams, M. M., Lindsey, S. F., Swetnam, D. M., Manning, B. R., Smith, A. J., Burrage, A. M., Wallace, G. N., MacNeill, A. L., Moyer, R. W. (2014). Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease. Journal of virology, 88(14), 7753-63.Moore, A. R., Allender, M. C., MacNeill, A. L. (2014). Effects of ranavirus infection of red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) on plasma proteins. Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine: official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, 45(2), 298-305.Tosic, V., Thomas, D. L., Kranz, D. M., Liu, J., McFadden, G., Shisler, J. L., MacNeill, A. L., Roy, E. J. (2014). Myxoma virus expressing a fusion protein of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL15 receptor alpha has enhanced antitumor activity. PloS one, 9(10), e109801.

Species Interest

Genetically engineered poxvirus recombinants The primary focus of my lab is to use genetically engineered poxvirus recombinants as novel treatments for cancer. I have a strong interest in promoting the study of dogs and cats afflicted with spontaneous tumors as models for human cancer patients. As a result of my research interests, several canine, feline, and human tumor cell cultures are being maintained and placed into cryostorage in my laboratory. In addition, I have a continued interest in studying host responses to virus infection.

                
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